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Author Topic: My fisherman grandfather...  (Read 11485 times)
GeorgeM
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« on: February 04, 2013, 05:54:13 PM »

I'm in the midst of writing a book, and I'm trying to find information relating to my grandfather. His name was George Henry Munday, born in Ramsgate in 1876 and lived for a while in Church Road (according to the 1911 census). I can recall some information, but it might be hearsay. For what it's worth...

1. He had his own fishing boat - perhaps the one in the attached photograph (maybe the man with the bowler hat).
2. I know that he definitely served in the RNVR; apparently on trawlers converted to a minesweepers. I'm also told that he was torpedoed twice, and despite being a non-swimmer, survived.
3. My grandmother's name was Alice, and I was told that she worked as a maid in the Town Hall of Ramsgate.
4. She had 4 children, Kathleen, George (my dad), Edith and Maud Stella, plus one or two who never survived childhood.
5. They all left Ramsgate to live in Liverpool,  probably around 1918 - I never did find out when - or even more importantly, why?
6. From when I knew my grandparents, he was working as a cobbler, in partnership with a man named Hans Kinder, who may have been in the Norwegian navy.

I'm not sure how much is true, but if anyone knows anything about this branch of the Munday family andcan throw any light on the above information, or identify the boat in the picture, I'd be delighted to hear from you. Many thanks.

George Munday (yes - another one!)


* Grandpa3.jpg (370.86 KB, 800x697 - viewed 326 times.)
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GeorgeM
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« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2013, 05:07:55 PM »

Hello Bona...Many thanks for replying so promptly.

It was a vague hope really because I have no idea where the photograph came from, I found it when I was sorting through my mother's effects after she died...and I reached the same conclusion about the age of the man in the picture. However, it could be my great-grandfather's boat - and my grandfather is the young lad leaning against the mast.

Is it possible that when the Maritime Museum opens they would have any records?  BTW I visited Ramsgate for a couple of days last year, and I'm pretty sure that the attached photograph was taken at the same location as the boat, although I don't suppose it will help.

BTW The book that I'm writing is based around my father's drawings and sketches, but I would really like to be able to write factually about his in Ramsgate early life. So if anyone has any ideas, hints, regarding the family history or the boat, I'd still love to hear from them. Many thanks.  George

 





* Ramsgate Quay.jpg (216.45 KB, 700x492 - viewed 302 times.)
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bona
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« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2013, 08:48:56 AM »


It is unfortunate that we cannot see the registered number of the fishing smack.
The 'R' can be seen but not the number that might identify the vessel.
Each new build or re=registered fishing vessel's details were logged in a large book kept in the Long Room. on the 2nd floor in the Custom House.
This building can be seen on the right side of the postcard.
A large copper domed, red brick building that is now home to a cafe/ restaurant.

Every British Sea Fishing Boat is required to be registered, lettered and numbered and to have a Certificate of Registry.

Vessels are measured and their registered tonnage calculated.  Harbour dues were based on this tonnage, later days that has reverted to the vessels length.
The Register now has been computerised and now handled by the Register of Shipping and Seamen in Cardiff.

The move to Liverpool seems sensible as many fishermen were being killed by ordnance and wrecks left from the war.
(2,000 ships are thought to have sunk on the Goodwin Sands over the centuries.)
The crews of the Campanula and Impulse(skipper Daniel Mynheer), lost their lives in incidents after the Great War.
Their names are on the Roll of Honour in the Sailors Church, Military Road.

Arthur Mynheer, skipper of the Ramsgate dredger spent his life on the water, in later years.

The Ramsgate Maritime Museum might furnish you with more details and it is a worthwhile visit anyway.

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seadog
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« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2013, 10:17:03 AM »

the volante was blown up by a mine in the nets the crew took to the ships boat and rowed to the tongue lightship to wait for the lifeboat to bring them ashore in the early 50,s i think possibly a record on the lifeboat boards in the pier yard at ramsgate
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GeorgeM
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2013, 03:41:51 PM »

Hello Folks

Many thanks for your replies.

I've continued researching, and I'm slowly getting information. I never quite realised the numbers of trawlers and drifters that were involved in WW1 incidents; the website http://www.naval-history.net/WW1LossesBrFV1914-16.htm  lists them.

I have to agree with Bona, it's a great pity that the reg number of the fishing boat in the photograph is just out of sight. The original print that I copied was quite small - I've tried using some bespoke sharpening software, and increasing the contrast etc, but it stays vague - although I think I can make out a number 6.

The good news is that the Fleet Air Arm Museum have my grandfather's service records, and for a small fee they are sending them onto me; hopefully it should reveal some of the details I'm after, I'll keep you posted.

Meanwhile, many thanks for your help...and if anyone has any knowledge of the Munday clan - or can suggest anywhere in or around Ramsgate that I might find information, I'd be delighted to receive it. (Hoping to get to Ramsgate in April)

George Munday

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bona
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2013, 10:58:38 AM »

A Mr George Munday owned a fishmonger and poulterers
in Ramsgate High Street in 1890.
This shop and the 2 neighbours were demolished in 1938 and replaced by Littlewoods. (New Look)

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Derek Lawbuary
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« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2016, 04:14:35 PM »

Below are the details of my maternal Grandfathers death.

It is believed he travelled to UK (Ramsgate, Kent) at the turn of the 19th century from an unknown Norwegian location. It is also known that he fought on the Western Front in the Great War as a gunner in the Royal Artillery.
I have been told that Tromm translates into English, or was changed to Thompson. There is also a memorial plaque dedicated to 'Campanula' in the Seaman's Church, Royal Harbour Ramsgate. Interestingly my Grandfather's name is shewn : Christine Thompson.
Any information would be sincerely appreciated in helping me find my Norwegian relatives.

Name: THOMPSON, CHRISTAIN
Initials: C
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Second Engineer
Regiment/Service: Mercantile Marine
Unit Text: Steam Trawler "Campanula" (Ramsgate)
Age: 37
Date of Death: 28/01/1920
Additional information: Husband of Maude Oliva Thompson (nee Fast), of 6, Florence Terrace, Cannonbury Rd., Ramsgate. Born in Norway.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Memorial: TOWER HILL MEMORIAL
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